What happens in communities where residents may have limited English-speaking abilities?

The U.S. Census Bureau will make the census questionnaire and other materials available in multiple languages based on its understanding of populations in the United States with limited English-speaking households.

The Census questionnaire will be available in Spanish as a print version, as well as on the enumerators’ tablets as options when doing field enumeration.

When responding online, the Internet Self-Response Instrument will be available in 12 non-English languages, which include Spanish, Chinese (Simplified), Vietnamese, Korean, Russian, Arabic, Tagalog, Polish, French, Haitian Creole, Portuguese, and Japanese.

The Census Bureau will provide Census Questionnaire Assistance by phone in 12 non-English languages, including Spanish, Chinese (Simplified), Vietnamese, Korean, Russian, Arabic, Tagalog, Polish, French, Haitian Creole, Portuguese, and Japanese, as well as in American Sign Language.

The U.S. Census Bureau will also produce a glossary of census terms, a card for enumerators to identify the language of the household, and video and print guides will be available in the 59 non-English languages listed below:


SpanishItalianKhmerTamil
CroatianChineseFarsiNepali
NavajoBulgarianVietnameseGerman
UrduHungarianTwiKorean
ArmenianRomanianHebrewLithuanian
RussianHindiTeluguMalayalam
YorubaArabicUkrainianBurmese
SwahiliCzechTagalogBengali
PunjabiYiddishIgboPolish
GreekLaoIndonesianMarathi
FrenchAmharicHmongSerbian
SinhalaHaitian CreoleSomaliAlbanian
TigrinyaSlovakPortugueseThai
TurkishIlocanoAmerican Sign LanguageJapanese
GujaratiBosnianDutch



 

For populations that speak languages beyond the 59 supported languages, the U.S. Census Bureau plans to create video shells and print templates for adaptation.

Below is a useful graphic to summarize the non-English language support:

Diagram showing the various levels of support for non-English speakers

Show All Answers

1. Why does the U.S. Census Bureau ask the question it asks?
2. Are my answers safe and secure?
3. How do I distinguish between an authentic U.S. Census Bureau contact & fraudulent activity & scams?
4. What does "residence" mean & how do I count the "residents" in my house?
5. Do I have to respond to the census?
6. How will the U.S. Census Bureau contact me & how am I to respond?
7. I already filled out a survey from the Census Bureau last year! Why have I been contacted again?
8. What happens in communities where residents may have limited English-speaking abilities?
9. What if I still have questions or concerns?
10. How will people experiencing homelessness be counted?
11. What does Language Assistance look like in the 2020 Census?